Buying Reviews

Just don’t friggin’ do it.

Last week I read a bit about John Locke buying reviews in order to hit as many sales as he did on Kindle (which was a million plus — he was the first self-pubbed author to hit the million sales mark, apparently).

I’m not going to get into the details — if you want, you can read Holly Lisle’s blog post, the New York Times article, Karen Woodward’s blog post, the write-up at Three Percent, Julie Ann Dawson’s blog post, and Jane Friedman’s blog post.

My opinion about this can be summed up thus:

  1. If you buy reviews you are an ass.
  2. John Locke is an ass.
  3. Don’t fucking buy reviews; it turns you into an ass.
  4. I swear to gods, some days I just want to smack the world.
  5. Asses.

Why Bellica is $4.99, and why my other books will be too

Friends! Romans! Countrymen fellow indie authors!

We are in a crisis. We have been selling ourselves short. Pricing our books at $0.99 just so we can get the impulse buys, driving the market down, forcing our fellow authors to do low prices as well just so they can compete.

This is all wrong.

If you’re publishing your book via Kindle you only get $0.3465 of that $0.99. Yeah. They take $0.6435. Sell a hundred copies and you’ve just made Amazon $64.35 and yourself $34.65 for a book that most likely took you a few years to write and countless sleepless nights.

Price it at $2.99 and your royalty jumps to 70% — $2.09 a book, while Amazon makes $0.90. Sell a hundred copies and suddenly you’ve made 209 dollars, while Amazon has made 90.

Which scenario makes more sense, here? Who should be getting the bulk of the money for your book? Amazon, who, yes, provides a valuable service but hasn’t done as much work on your book as you have and will still not promote it for you, or you, who’s written it, gotten it edited, found a cover design, formatted it, advertised it, sweated over it, lost sleep over it, and obsessed about it from conception to completion?

Bellica took me 13 years to complete. Why would I sell myself short? It’s worth $4.99 — hells, it’s worth more than that, but I had to drop the price to stay competitive.

Writing is now my full time job. This means that Bellica will remain that price for ebook format, and the paperback will remain $26.99. This means that The Jade Star of Athering will be $4.99 after the promo period price of $2.99; as will Dead Transgressions, Islands of Fire and Water, and any other novels I produce. Novellas and poetry collections will be slightly lower, but I will never drop my books below the price of $2.99.

Continue reading “Why Bellica is $4.99, and why my other books will be too”

Hot fresh novel, available on Kindle now!

As I mentioned briefly on Saturday, Bellica is now available for the Kindle.

I ended up pricing it at $7.99, which is a bit lower than the $9.99 I had originally planned on, but still an accurate representation of the novel’s length and, frankly, what I feel I deserve for it. Also, this price was decided upon after extensive market research* by yours truly.

I’m currently also working on the CreateSpace file for a new paperback version of Bellica — one that will have bigger font and more pages. It will also be more widely available. More news on that as it unfolds.

Finally, you’ll notice few posts here and at Gossip Diet. I’m currently unable to type while sitting up and typing while lying down (the only position available to me) takes a lot of time and effort and causes me some pain. Therefore I shall be posting half as much at each blog, because that equals one blogs’ worth of posts, I think.

In the meantime, I have to wait for my back to slowly get better. It’s going slow, because it hates me. And now I hate it just as much.

 

*Extensive market research definition: I ran a poll on Facebook.