Postponing the book launch for Stranger Skies

My book launch for Stranger Skies is supposed to be this Sunday, the 24th of November, at the Cottage Bistro in Vancouver. I’m having to postpone it. There were several delays in editing and formatting, which has led to printing delays. I won’t have books ready in time unless there’s an act of the gods. The good kind of act.

I talked with my publisher and we decided postponing the event would be the best for everyone’s stress levels. It will also give us more time to market the event and get people to show up.

Currently the date I’m hoping for is February 2nd. It’s Imbolc, which is a holiday of great importance to me; it’s right before Valentine’s Day, and the book has strong romantic elements; it’s far enough away that we can probably get the date and have enough time to get everything together.

In the meantime I will have print copies available locally. Starting December 5th you can speak to me or my publisher directly for copies. Starting early 2014 we’ll have them available online.

Currently the ebook is available and you can read the ARC online. There is a large difference between the ARC and the finished book; my editor is amazing. If you like the ARC enough to read the whole thing, consider purchasing the ebook.

Kat & Wolff will be at Vancouver Island Pagan Pride Day

Hey, you know what’s in 10 days? Vancouver Island Pagan Pride Day! And Kat & Wolff will be there, vending.

Formerly Nanaimo Pagan Pride Day, it’s changed its name to reflect that it’s the main Pagan Pride event on the Island. People from all ends of Vancouver Island come to Nanaimo for it, and at some point (perhaps still?) I believe it was the largest Pagan Pride event in Canada. It’s held very close to Departure Bay, so coming over on the ferry for the day is totally possible and pretty easy.

PPD_Poster_2013_v21If you’re in Nanaimo on that day you should come check out our booth. We’ll be right across the ATC-Canada booth, and not only will we be selling our books but we’ll also have some of Wolff’s famous onbijtkoek. Plus, Lord Tyee the houdini-wolf will be there! Come by, chat with us, pet the dog, and have some koek. (Also, bring a donation for the food bank drive, if you can.) You won’t regret it.

-Kat

Documentary Filmmaking is not for control freaks or cripples

Last week I went up to Powell River, where I was supposed to film some things. Communication was sketchy that first week and I didn’t fully understand what I’d be doing until the end of the weekend — namely, a ten-minute documentary — but regardless, I got some good shots.

A new camera was in order, as the one I was using was 12 years old and guess what — they don’t make tape for it anymore. (We do have access to a firewire to grab the two hours of tape I did manage to shoot, so that’s all good.) As was a new tripod, because when you take long sabbaticals from filmmaking and move a bunch things go missing.

I had to film in an elementary school where Margriet Ruurs was doing workshops on poetry as part of the International Peace Poem Walkers’ Association’s Youth Peace Poem Competition and literacy initiative. The documentary itself is about the Youth Peace Poem Competition and how it — and the workshops funded by it — have positive impacts on the kids and the community.

[The showing of the documentary will be on May 31st, during the awards ceremony. For pretty much every weekend in May I’ll be in Powell River filming and editing, and I have class from 9-4 on Mondays and Wednesdays in Nanaimo (my final class before graduation with my BA).]

First lesson about documentaries: they are organic creatures. You can set out with an idea of what you want to say, and how you want to say it, but you won’t actually know for sure how it’ll play out until you’ve started filming. Buy enough film (or memory, I guess, is how they do it on the new future cameras they got) to canvas an entire continent, every day, all day for several months. And about ten extra batteries.

Second lesson:  you have to be ready for action. That means you must be able to catch things on the spur of the moment; have to be able to drive anywhere, get into any sort of position, run with your camera.

Third lesson: it is like herding cats. Especially when you’re filming in an elementary school, just saying.

Things you should know about me:

  • I am a control freak the likes of which would scare Monica Gellar.
  • I am crippled. Or, you know, disabled, non-able-bodied, whatever is the most acceptable term. I prefer the term cripple, because it’s how I feel. (Also it creates a bit of an alliteration in the title of this blog post, which is important to me.) I also have a lot of chronic health issues, which adds to the feeling. Regardless, the point is I cannot run with a camera; I walk with a cane; I am not able-bodied enough to really be ready for action. I am also a dense thicket in marshy land.

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Things Overheard at Cue-to-Cue/Tech Dress for Dog Sees God

(By overheard, I mean said by me.)

“Play my vagina like the bongos.”

A pair of bongos - percussion instrument Deuts...

“This cup came all over my tits.”

“I just hit the riser and make the Africa face.”

“Hand-jobs: also played like the bongos. I hope that image stays with you when you meet my boyfriend on Saturday.”

“You brought cookies? I want to kiss you on the mouth. Except I won’t, because, you know, but still. I wanna kiss you on the mouth.”

Continue reading “Things Overheard at Cue-to-Cue/Tech Dress for Dog Sees God”